Ections (pneumonia, cellulitis, and septicemia/bacteremia) as principal diagnoses. All clinically plausible bivariate variables with P,0.20 were considered for entry into the models. McNemar’s test was used to determine if there was any statistically significant difference in pre-admission statin use amongst the cases vs controls.Results Incidence of bacterial infection in diabetic patients and controlsAt study entry, the 1,294 FDS1 type 2 participants had a mean6SD age of 64.1611.3 years, 48.8 were male and their median [IQR] get P7C3 diabetes duration was 4.0 (1.0?.0) years. AngloCelts comprised the main racial/ethnic group (61.5 ) with those from Southern European (17.7 ) and other European (8.5 ) backgrounds the next largest, followed by Asian (3.3 ), Aboriginal (1.5 ) and mixed/ other (7.5 ) origins. There were 15.3 of FDS subjects who were non-fluent in English and 26.0 who had not been educated beyond primary level, with non-Anglo-Celt patients over-represented in these categories. Almost two-thirds (65.8 ) of the cohort were married/in a de facto relationship. During follow-up from study entry until death or 31 December 2010, a total of 15,535 patient-years or a mean6SD of 12.065.years, 251 (19.4 ) were hospitalized on 368 occasions for infection as principal diagnosis. Therefore, the crude incidence (95 CI) of hospitalization for infection was 23.7 (21.3?6.2)/1,000 patientyears. The 368 admissions consisted of pneumonia (n = 181, 49.2 ), cellulitis (n = 107, 29.1 ), septicemia/bacteremia (n = 42, 11.4 ), osteomyelitis (n = 19, 5.2 ), genitourinary infection (acute pyelonephritis, renal/perinephric abscess or cystitis; n = 14, 3.8 ) and others (meningococcal disease, otitis media, otitis externa, sinusitis and other bacterial infection; n = 5, 1.4 ; see Figure 1). There were 771 hospitalizations for infection in 577 (11.2 ) controls over 69,350 patient-years, representing a crude incidence of 11.1 (10.4?1.9)/1,000 patient-years. The 771 admissions comprised pneumonia (n = 435, 56.4 ), cellulitis (n = 195, 25.3 ), septicemia (n = 90, 11.7 ), genitourinary infection (n = 22, 2.9 ), osteomyelitis (n = 21, 2.7 ) and others (sinusitis, otitis externa and bacterial infection; n = 8, 1.0 ; see Figure 1). The overall incidence of hospitalization for bacterial infections in FDS1 patients with type 2 diabetes was more than double that in the matched controls (IRR (95 CI): 2.13 (1.88?.42), P,0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the proportions of infections by type in the two groups of patients (Chi-squared 8.93, df = 5, P = 0.11), and the Chebulagic acid biological activity average number of hospitalizations for infection per patient was also similar (1.47 in the diabetic patients vs 1.34 in the non-diabetic controls). IRRs for pneumonia, cellulitis, and septicemia/bacteremia were, respectively, 1.86 (1.55?.21), 2.45 (1.92?.12), and 2.08 (1.41?.04), all P,0.001.Bivariate predictors of incident bacterial infections in the diabetic patientsOlder age, longer diabetes duration, higher BMI, systolic blood pressure, fasting serum triglycerides and urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR), ischemic heart disease, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy and eGFR ,60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and prior hospitalization for any infection (as principal diagnosis between January 1982 and FDS1 study entry) were all associated with hospitalization for any infection during follow-up in bivariate analyses (P,0.05; see Table 2). There was no significant difference in fasting plasma glucos.Ections (pneumonia, cellulitis, and septicemia/bacteremia) as principal diagnoses. All clinically plausible bivariate variables with P,0.20 were considered for entry into the models. McNemar’s test was used to determine if there was any statistically significant difference in pre-admission statin use amongst the cases vs controls.Results Incidence of bacterial infection in diabetic patients and controlsAt study entry, the 1,294 FDS1 type 2 participants had a mean6SD age of 64.1611.3 years, 48.8 were male and their median [IQR] diabetes duration was 4.0 (1.0?.0) years. AngloCelts comprised the main racial/ethnic group (61.5 ) with those from Southern European (17.7 ) and other European (8.5 ) backgrounds the next largest, followed by Asian (3.3 ), Aboriginal (1.5 ) and mixed/ other (7.5 ) origins. There were 15.3 of FDS subjects who were non-fluent in English and 26.0 who had not been educated beyond primary level, with non-Anglo-Celt patients over-represented in these categories. Almost two-thirds (65.8 ) of the cohort were married/in a de facto relationship. During follow-up from study entry until death or 31 December 2010, a total of 15,535 patient-years or a mean6SD of 12.065.years, 251 (19.4 ) were hospitalized on 368 occasions for infection as principal diagnosis. Therefore, the crude incidence (95 CI) of hospitalization for infection was 23.7 (21.3?6.2)/1,000 patientyears. The 368 admissions consisted of pneumonia (n = 181, 49.2 ), cellulitis (n = 107, 29.1 ), septicemia/bacteremia (n = 42, 11.4 ), osteomyelitis (n = 19, 5.2 ), genitourinary infection (acute pyelonephritis, renal/perinephric abscess or cystitis; n = 14, 3.8 ) and others (meningococcal disease, otitis media, otitis externa, sinusitis and other bacterial infection; n = 5, 1.4 ; see Figure 1). There were 771 hospitalizations for infection in 577 (11.2 ) controls over 69,350 patient-years, representing a crude incidence of 11.1 (10.4?1.9)/1,000 patient-years. The 771 admissions comprised pneumonia (n = 435, 56.4 ), cellulitis (n = 195, 25.3 ), septicemia (n = 90, 11.7 ), genitourinary infection (n = 22, 2.9 ), osteomyelitis (n = 21, 2.7 ) and others (sinusitis, otitis externa and bacterial infection; n = 8, 1.0 ; see Figure 1). The overall incidence of hospitalization for bacterial infections in FDS1 patients with type 2 diabetes was more than double that in the matched controls (IRR (95 CI): 2.13 (1.88?.42), P,0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the proportions of infections by type in the two groups of patients (Chi-squared 8.93, df = 5, P = 0.11), and the average number of hospitalizations for infection per patient was also similar (1.47 in the diabetic patients vs 1.34 in the non-diabetic controls). IRRs for pneumonia, cellulitis, and septicemia/bacteremia were, respectively, 1.86 (1.55?.21), 2.45 (1.92?.12), and 2.08 (1.41?.04), all P,0.001.Bivariate predictors of incident bacterial infections in the diabetic patientsOlder age, longer diabetes duration, higher BMI, systolic blood pressure, fasting serum triglycerides and urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR), ischemic heart disease, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy and eGFR ,60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and prior hospitalization for any infection (as principal diagnosis between January 1982 and FDS1 study entry) were all associated with hospitalization for any infection during follow-up in bivariate analyses (P,0.05; see Table 2). There was no significant difference in fasting plasma glucos.

Ections (pneumonia, cellulitis, and septicemia/bacteremia) as principal diagnoses. All clinically

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