Able levels, with HB-EGF and KGF either under or very close to the detection limit of the assay (3.7 and 1.95 pg/ml, respectively) in most samples and without any significant difference among the PBMC subgroups. On the other hand, TPO, PDGF-AA,VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 were released at consistent levels by the PBMC samples assessed. Of interest, a significant higher release of PDGF-AA (p,0.01) characterized the EPC/ECFCpos PBMC, with respect to the other subgroups (Figure 2), suggesting a correlation between the release of these cytokines and the circulating EPC/ECFC, which was confirmed by Pearson analysis (R = 0.75, p,0.01). No significant correlations were found between the generation of CFU-EC and the levels of the different cytokines tested.Identification of optimal culture conditions for the identification and ex-vivo expansion of EPC/ECFCFor the identification of primary EPC/ECFC, 23727046 patient PBMC were seeded in three different culture media (as detailed in the Methods). Growth of EPC/ECFC was detected only by using the M5100 medium, while and MEGM and in M199 were ineffective for this purpose. In order to perform further cell characterizations, we searched for the optimal culture conditions for the in vitro expansion of the primary EPC/ECFC, by assessing the change of buy Dimethylenastron medium after the initial plating in M5100. Indeed, while M5100 medium was necessary to obtain primary colonies, reaching a mean number of 102625 cells/colony after 15 days of culture, a switch of the medium to MEGM, which is a medium particularlyEndothelial Progenitor Cells in ACS PatientsFigure 4. Immunophenotype of EPC/ECFC generated from the PBMC of ACS patients. After ex-vivo expansion, primary EPC/ECFC colonies were 115103-85-0 chemical information trypsinized and assessed for their immuno-phenotype by multi-colors flow cytometry. In A, the variable expression of the CD34 antigene is documented by 3 independent examples of EPC/ECFC colonies. In B, 4-colors flow cytometric analysis of EPC/ECFC cells. A representative example of 7 independent experiments is shown. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056377.genriched of angiogenic cytokines, after the colony identification (approximately at day 5 after PBMC plating), significantly (p,0.05) improved the growth kinetics (Figure 3A). Upon in vitro expansion, primary EPC/ECFC were characterized by immunohistochemical analysis, showing a uniform positivity for the specific endothelial marker Von Willebrandt factor (Factor VIII), as well as for CD105 (Figure 3B) and CD(data not shown). As far as the expression pattern of these markers is concerned, differences were noticed about the intensity and the antigens localization. In particular, the expression of the factor VIII appeared as an intense punctate perinuclear staining (Figure 3B). On the other hand, the KDR (VEGFR-1) antigen was weakly expressed by all cells and CD106 (V-CAM) is normally expressed by a lower percentage of activated EPC/ECFC (data not shown).Endothelial Progenitor Cells in ACS PatientsFigure 5. Subcloning potential of EPC/ECFC generated from the PBMC of ACS patients. After ex-vivo expansion, primary EPC/ECFC colonies were trypsinized and assessed for clonogenic potential capacity by single cells replating assay. In A, single cells derived from EPC/ECPF colonies were seeded in collagen I coated wells and monitored day by day (a: day 1; b: day 2; c: day 3; e : day 4; a : original magnification 25X; f: original magnification 40X). One representative experiment is shown. In B, secondary clones were classifi.Able levels, with HB-EGF and KGF either under or very close to the detection limit of the assay (3.7 and 1.95 pg/ml, respectively) in most samples and without any significant difference among the PBMC subgroups. On the other hand, TPO, PDGF-AA,VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 were released at consistent levels by the PBMC samples assessed. Of interest, a significant higher release of PDGF-AA (p,0.01) characterized the EPC/ECFCpos PBMC, with respect to the other subgroups (Figure 2), suggesting a correlation between the release of these cytokines and the circulating EPC/ECFC, which was confirmed by Pearson analysis (R = 0.75, p,0.01). No significant correlations were found between the generation of CFU-EC and the levels of the different cytokines tested.Identification of optimal culture conditions for the identification and ex-vivo expansion of EPC/ECFCFor the identification of primary EPC/ECFC, 23727046 patient PBMC were seeded in three different culture media (as detailed in the Methods). Growth of EPC/ECFC was detected only by using the M5100 medium, while and MEGM and in M199 were ineffective for this purpose. In order to perform further cell characterizations, we searched for the optimal culture conditions for the in vitro expansion of the primary EPC/ECFC, by assessing the change of medium after the initial plating in M5100. Indeed, while M5100 medium was necessary to obtain primary colonies, reaching a mean number of 102625 cells/colony after 15 days of culture, a switch of the medium to MEGM, which is a medium particularlyEndothelial Progenitor Cells in ACS PatientsFigure 4. Immunophenotype of EPC/ECFC generated from the PBMC of ACS patients. After ex-vivo expansion, primary EPC/ECFC colonies were trypsinized and assessed for their immuno-phenotype by multi-colors flow cytometry. In A, the variable expression of the CD34 antigene is documented by 3 independent examples of EPC/ECFC colonies. In B, 4-colors flow cytometric analysis of EPC/ECFC cells. A representative example of 7 independent experiments is shown. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056377.genriched of angiogenic cytokines, after the colony identification (approximately at day 5 after PBMC plating), significantly (p,0.05) improved the growth kinetics (Figure 3A). Upon in vitro expansion, primary EPC/ECFC were characterized by immunohistochemical analysis, showing a uniform positivity for the specific endothelial marker Von Willebrandt factor (Factor VIII), as well as for CD105 (Figure 3B) and CD(data not shown). As far as the expression pattern of these markers is concerned, differences were noticed about the intensity and the antigens localization. In particular, the expression of the factor VIII appeared as an intense punctate perinuclear staining (Figure 3B). On the other hand, the KDR (VEGFR-1) antigen was weakly expressed by all cells and CD106 (V-CAM) is normally expressed by a lower percentage of activated EPC/ECFC (data not shown).Endothelial Progenitor Cells in ACS PatientsFigure 5. Subcloning potential of EPC/ECFC generated from the PBMC of ACS patients. After ex-vivo expansion, primary EPC/ECFC colonies were trypsinized and assessed for clonogenic potential capacity by single cells replating assay. In A, single cells derived from EPC/ECPF colonies were seeded in collagen I coated wells and monitored day by day (a: day 1; b: day 2; c: day 3; e : day 4; a : original magnification 25X; f: original magnification 40X). One representative experiment is shown. In B, secondary clones were classifi.

Able levels, with HB-EGF and KGF either under or very close

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