N Figure 2A show that INa is substantially reduced by the mutation I890T. This reduction was confirmed by analysis of peak INa density, which showed a significant decrease in the current-Z-360 site voltage relationship (I ) of I890T cells with respect to WT cells (Fig 2B, Table 1). In addition, we observed a positive shift of the activation curve towards more positive potentials (Fig. 3), which further contributes to the loss-of-function of I890T channels. Data fitting to a Boltzmann equation revealed a significant 5 mV shift of V1/2 in I890T respect to WT cells, whereas no changes were observed in the slope factor (Table 1). Next, we assessed the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation for WT and I890T cells. The mutation I890T did not affect the voltage dependence of channel availability (Fig. 3, Table 1). Analysis of the time courses of inactivation, slow inactivation and recovery from inactivation are illustrated in Figure 4. Inactivation time constants were obtained from fitting the timeFigure 3. 18325633 I890T modifies Nav1.5 channel activation kinetics. INa voltage-dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation for WT and I890T cells. Conductance values for the activation curve were obtained from the peak current values taken from Figure 2. Symbols represent experimental data plotted Licochalcone-A web against the given depolarizing voltage values for WT (filled circles) and I890T (open circles). Steadystate inactivation protocol is shown in the inset on the left. Relative current values were determined using 500 ms pre-pulses to different potentials followed by a test pulse to 220 mV. Symbols represent experimental data plotted against preconditioning pulse values for WT (filled squares) and I890T (open squares). Values are expressed as mean 6 SE. Solid lines represent the Boltzmann fit of the experimental points. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053220.gNovel Nav1.5 Pore Mutation I890T Causes BrSfunction (from 220 to 20 mV), and the resulting time constants (t) were plotted versus the applied voltage for WT and I890T. (B) Voltage dependence of slow inactivation for WT and I890T were studied by applying the double protocol pulse shown in the inset. A 20?70 ms conditioning pre-pulse to 220 (P1) was followed by a 20 ms hyperpolarization to 2120 mV, to recover fast-inactivated channels, and then a 20 ms test pulse to 220 mV (P2). The peak current ratio P2/ P1 was plotted against the P1 prepulse duration, and data was fitted to mono-exponential functions (solid lines). (C) Recovery from inactivation properties for WT and I890T were studied by applying the double pulse protocol shown in the inset. A 50 ms depolarizing pulse to 220 mV (P1) was followed by a hyperpolarizing pulse to 2120 mV of increasing duration (1?0 ms), that preceded a test pulse to 220 mV (P2). The P2/ P1 ratio values plotted against the recovery interval times were fitted to mono-exponential functions (solid lines). A, B and C: Values are expressed as mean 6 SE. Symbols represent values for WT (filled symbols) and I890T (open symbols). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053220.gcourse of the currents elicited with the stimulation protocol used for the I relationship, and plotted as a function of voltage (Fig. 4A). The time constants for I890T and WT currents remained similar at the voltage range analyzed. Double pulse protocols were used to study INa slow inactivation and recovery from inactivation. No differences were found either in the slow inactivation or recovery from inactivation parameters obta.N Figure 2A show that INa is substantially reduced by the mutation I890T. This reduction was confirmed by analysis of peak INa density, which showed a significant decrease in the current-voltage relationship (I ) of I890T cells with respect to WT cells (Fig 2B, Table 1). In addition, we observed a positive shift of the activation curve towards more positive potentials (Fig. 3), which further contributes to the loss-of-function of I890T channels. Data fitting to a Boltzmann equation revealed a significant 5 mV shift of V1/2 in I890T respect to WT cells, whereas no changes were observed in the slope factor (Table 1). Next, we assessed the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation for WT and I890T cells. The mutation I890T did not affect the voltage dependence of channel availability (Fig. 3, Table 1). Analysis of the time courses of inactivation, slow inactivation and recovery from inactivation are illustrated in Figure 4. Inactivation time constants were obtained from fitting the timeFigure 3. 18325633 I890T modifies Nav1.5 channel activation kinetics. INa voltage-dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation for WT and I890T cells. Conductance values for the activation curve were obtained from the peak current values taken from Figure 2. Symbols represent experimental data plotted against the given depolarizing voltage values for WT (filled circles) and I890T (open circles). Steadystate inactivation protocol is shown in the inset on the left. Relative current values were determined using 500 ms pre-pulses to different potentials followed by a test pulse to 220 mV. Symbols represent experimental data plotted against preconditioning pulse values for WT (filled squares) and I890T (open squares). Values are expressed as mean 6 SE. Solid lines represent the Boltzmann fit of the experimental points. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053220.gNovel Nav1.5 Pore Mutation I890T Causes BrSfunction (from 220 to 20 mV), and the resulting time constants (t) were plotted versus the applied voltage for WT and I890T. (B) Voltage dependence of slow inactivation for WT and I890T were studied by applying the double protocol pulse shown in the inset. A 20?70 ms conditioning pre-pulse to 220 (P1) was followed by a 20 ms hyperpolarization to 2120 mV, to recover fast-inactivated channels, and then a 20 ms test pulse to 220 mV (P2). The peak current ratio P2/ P1 was plotted against the P1 prepulse duration, and data was fitted to mono-exponential functions (solid lines). (C) Recovery from inactivation properties for WT and I890T were studied by applying the double pulse protocol shown in the inset. A 50 ms depolarizing pulse to 220 mV (P1) was followed by a hyperpolarizing pulse to 2120 mV of increasing duration (1?0 ms), that preceded a test pulse to 220 mV (P2). The P2/ P1 ratio values plotted against the recovery interval times were fitted to mono-exponential functions (solid lines). A, B and C: Values are expressed as mean 6 SE. Symbols represent values for WT (filled symbols) and I890T (open symbols). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053220.gcourse of the currents elicited with the stimulation protocol used for the I relationship, and plotted as a function of voltage (Fig. 4A). The time constants for I890T and WT currents remained similar at the voltage range analyzed. Double pulse protocols were used to study INa slow inactivation and recovery from inactivation. No differences were found either in the slow inactivation or recovery from inactivation parameters obta.

N Figure 2A show that INa is substantially reduced by the

About author

Leave a reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.