Al pathway, and one that connected the amygdala with the diencephalon.

Al pathway, and one that connected the amygdala with the diencephalon. The visual pathway observed in the tractography data may reflect afferent connections from the visual cortex,ProcedureDuring the experiment, we presented a series of novel (NOV), BLU-554 biological activity repeated but not shocked (CS?, and repeated but shocked (CS? faces (Figure 1). Pictures were presented for 8 s, with a 20-s variable intertrial interval. The 500 ms shock UCS coterminated with the CS? and was presented on every CS?trial. The analysis included five trials of each stimulus type, and we only counted repeated presentations in the CS?and CS?categories. Two repeated images (CS?and CS? were each presented six times, five novel images were each presented once. The initial AZD0156 site presentation of the CS?was included in the NOV category because it was novel at the time of the presentation. Although theFig. 2. We identified subregions of the amygdala using anatomical connectivity. Fig. 1. We presented face images in an event-related fMRI design. One image was repeatedly presented and paired with a shock (CS?. One image was repeatedly presented and not paired with a shock (CS?. Novel images were presented and not repeated. Images were presented for 8 s. The initial (novel) presentation of the CS?and CS?were not used included in their respective categories. Instead the initial presentation of the CS?was considered novel, and the initial presentation of the CS?was excluded from the analysis. First we defined the amygdala for each individual using the Freesurfersegmented T1. Next we identified white matter pathways from the diffusion tensor images (DTI) using probablistic tractography. Purple pathways connect the amygdala with the visual cortex. Yellow pathways connect the amygdala with the diencephalon. Subsequently we identified the regions of interest (ROIs) within the amygdala containing these white matter pathways. Finally we sampled the high-resolution BOLD activity using these ROIs.|Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 2015, Vol. 10, No.while the diencephalic pathway may reflect efferent connections to the hypothalamus (Krettek and Price, 1977; Amaral et al., 1992; Price, 2003). Next we selected the fibers that intersected with both the amygdala, and the destination ROI (visual cortex, diencephalon), and created anatomical masks from these two pathways. Finally, we exported these masks as NIFTI volumes, and subdivided the amygdala by overlaying the white matter volumes on the amygdala volumes. Our analysis identified four distinct amygdala subregions: one region connected with the visual cortex (laterobasal), one region connected with the diencephalon (centromedial), one region representing the overlap between these two regions, and the interspersed tissue showing no anatomical connectivity (interspersed). In order to determine which subregion the overlap area predominantly belonged to, we compared the pattern of activity in the overlap region to the pattern of activity of the two other connected regions for each subject. Then, for each subject we assigned the overlap region to the subregion in such a way that it minimized the sum of the squared deviations across stimulus types. Next, we sampled the BOLD activity from the functional run using these three subregions.suggests an effect for conditioning (Figure 3B). This is supported by a significant CS ?> CS?pairwise t-test (t(18) ?3.46; P < 0.03). Consistent with previous results (Balderston et al., 2011), we found that novelty evoke.Al pathway, and one that connected the amygdala with the diencephalon. The visual pathway observed in the tractography data may reflect afferent connections from the visual cortex,ProcedureDuring the experiment, we presented a series of novel (NOV), repeated but not shocked (CS?, and repeated but shocked (CS? faces (Figure 1). Pictures were presented for 8 s, with a 20-s variable intertrial interval. The 500 ms shock UCS coterminated with the CS? and was presented on every CS?trial. The analysis included five trials of each stimulus type, and we only counted repeated presentations in the CS?and CS?categories. Two repeated images (CS?and CS? were each presented six times, five novel images were each presented once. The initial presentation of the CS?was included in the NOV category because it was novel at the time of the presentation. Although theFig. 2. We identified subregions of the amygdala using anatomical connectivity. Fig. 1. We presented face images in an event-related fMRI design. One image was repeatedly presented and paired with a shock (CS?. One image was repeatedly presented and not paired with a shock (CS?. Novel images were presented and not repeated. Images were presented for 8 s. The initial (novel) presentation of the CS?and CS?were not used included in their respective categories. Instead the initial presentation of the CS?was considered novel, and the initial presentation of the CS?was excluded from the analysis. First we defined the amygdala for each individual using the Freesurfersegmented T1. Next we identified white matter pathways from the diffusion tensor images (DTI) using probablistic tractography. Purple pathways connect the amygdala with the visual cortex. Yellow pathways connect the amygdala with the diencephalon. Subsequently we identified the regions of interest (ROIs) within the amygdala containing these white matter pathways. Finally we sampled the high-resolution BOLD activity using these ROIs.|Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 2015, Vol. 10, No.while the diencephalic pathway may reflect efferent connections to the hypothalamus (Krettek and Price, 1977; Amaral et al., 1992; Price, 2003). Next we selected the fibers that intersected with both the amygdala, and the destination ROI (visual cortex, diencephalon), and created anatomical masks from these two pathways. Finally, we exported these masks as NIFTI volumes, and subdivided the amygdala by overlaying the white matter volumes on the amygdala volumes. Our analysis identified four distinct amygdala subregions: one region connected with the visual cortex (laterobasal), one region connected with the diencephalon (centromedial), one region representing the overlap between these two regions, and the interspersed tissue showing no anatomical connectivity (interspersed). In order to determine which subregion the overlap area predominantly belonged to, we compared the pattern of activity in the overlap region to the pattern of activity of the two other connected regions for each subject. Then, for each subject we assigned the overlap region to the subregion in such a way that it minimized the sum of the squared deviations across stimulus types. Next, we sampled the BOLD activity from the functional run using these three subregions.suggests an effect for conditioning (Figure 3B). This is supported by a significant CS ?> CS?pairwise t-test (t(18) ?3.46; P < 0.03). Consistent with previous results (Balderston et al., 2011), we found that novelty evoke.