Mains as targets for therapeutic treatment of viral infection has been

Mains as targets for therapeutic treatment of viral infection has been highlighted by using a chimeric antibody that recognizes PS bound to membrane glycoproteins (mAb 3G4) [133]. Recently, phosphatidylcholine (PC) enrichment in neuronal structures has been revealed by an antibody against PC (mAb #15) [134]. These examples illustrate that antibodies can be useful to study membrane organization into submicrometric domains (see Table 1). However, one must remain cautious of the drawbacks of antibodies since they require fixation (see Section 2.2.2), occasionally permeabilization and can exhibit multivalence leading to patching [135]. To overcome these issues, it is preferable to use fragments that do not create patching. One method is based on antibodies hydrolyzed into Fab fragments [136]. To the best of our knowledge, there is still no study using fluorescently labeled Fab fragments directed against lipids to study membrane organization. However, primary antibodies against galactosylceramide followed by fluorescent secondary Fab fragments have revealed submicrometric domains in oligodendrocytes induced by co-culture with neurons, ruling out that domains were induced by crosslinking of secondary antibodies [137]. An alternative approach would be to exploit the derivatives of Camelidae antibodies. Unlike conventional antibodies which are made of heavy and light chains, the antibodies from Camelidae are only composed of two identical heavy chains, each being fully capable of binding independently the affiliated antigen. The advantages of isolating single heavy chain fragments from Camelidae, also called nano-antibodies or nanobodiesTM, rely upon their small size as compared to Fab fragments ( 15 vs 55kDa, respectively) that can reach confined areas inaccessible to larger probes [138]. Such nanobodies have been developed for epithelial growth factor receptor, allowing to evidence a cholesterol-independent colocalization of the receptor with GM1 ganglioside [139]. However, there is still a lack of studies using nanobodies to detect submicrometric lipid domains. Nevertheless, the generation of fluorescently conjugated Fab fragments or nanobodies against lipids could in the future become an interesting strategy for analyzing membrane lipid organization.Author Tasigna web Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptProg Lipid Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2017 April 01.3-Methyladenine supplier Carquin et al.Page3.2. MethodsAuthor Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptThe low imaging resolution, combined with the poor preservation of lipid organization upon fixation (see Section 2.2.2), has been a major limitation for studying the dynamic compartmentalization of lipid species in cells. The advent of improved imaging technologies has provided the opportunity to rectify these constraints and learn about lipid domain morphology and dynamics in cells. This section gives a brief and non-exhaustive overview of modern microscopy techniques with their advantages and limitations in the context of lipid organization into submicrometric domains (Table 2). The Table also lists selected reviews to which the reader can refer for an in-depth information about techniques. Moreover, selected techniques are illustrated in Figs. 4-7. 3.2.1. High-resolution confocal microscopy and related techniques– Contemporary microscopy has evolved from whole-cell visualization to high-resolution microscopy that can discriminate objects down to the diffrac.Mains as targets for therapeutic treatment of viral infection has been highlighted by using a chimeric antibody that recognizes PS bound to membrane glycoproteins (mAb 3G4) [133]. Recently, phosphatidylcholine (PC) enrichment in neuronal structures has been revealed by an antibody against PC (mAb #15) [134]. These examples illustrate that antibodies can be useful to study membrane organization into submicrometric domains (see Table 1). However, one must remain cautious of the drawbacks of antibodies since they require fixation (see Section 2.2.2), occasionally permeabilization and can exhibit multivalence leading to patching [135]. To overcome these issues, it is preferable to use fragments that do not create patching. One method is based on antibodies hydrolyzed into Fab fragments [136]. To the best of our knowledge, there is still no study using fluorescently labeled Fab fragments directed against lipids to study membrane organization. However, primary antibodies against galactosylceramide followed by fluorescent secondary Fab fragments have revealed submicrometric domains in oligodendrocytes induced by co-culture with neurons, ruling out that domains were induced by crosslinking of secondary antibodies [137]. An alternative approach would be to exploit the derivatives of Camelidae antibodies. Unlike conventional antibodies which are made of heavy and light chains, the antibodies from Camelidae are only composed of two identical heavy chains, each being fully capable of binding independently the affiliated antigen. The advantages of isolating single heavy chain fragments from Camelidae, also called nano-antibodies or nanobodiesTM, rely upon their small size as compared to Fab fragments ( 15 vs 55kDa, respectively) that can reach confined areas inaccessible to larger probes [138]. Such nanobodies have been developed for epithelial growth factor receptor, allowing to evidence a cholesterol-independent colocalization of the receptor with GM1 ganglioside [139]. However, there is still a lack of studies using nanobodies to detect submicrometric lipid domains. Nevertheless, the generation of fluorescently conjugated Fab fragments or nanobodies against lipids could in the future become an interesting strategy for analyzing membrane lipid organization.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptProg Lipid Res. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2017 April 01.Carquin et al.Page3.2. MethodsAuthor Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptThe low imaging resolution, combined with the poor preservation of lipid organization upon fixation (see Section 2.2.2), has been a major limitation for studying the dynamic compartmentalization of lipid species in cells. The advent of improved imaging technologies has provided the opportunity to rectify these constraints and learn about lipid domain morphology and dynamics in cells. This section gives a brief and non-exhaustive overview of modern microscopy techniques with their advantages and limitations in the context of lipid organization into submicrometric domains (Table 2). The Table also lists selected reviews to which the reader can refer for an in-depth information about techniques. Moreover, selected techniques are illustrated in Figs. 4-7. 3.2.1. High-resolution confocal microscopy and related techniques– Contemporary microscopy has evolved from whole-cell visualization to high-resolution microscopy that can discriminate objects down to the diffrac.