His endeavour to extend the political meanings of Cooper’s alleged

His endeavour to extend the political meanings of Cooper’s alleged incompetence. Not only was the trial extremely well attended, but when he finally emerged from the court he was greeted by a large crowd and `cheered by the populace in Palace Yard’.97 Moreover, popular interest in the trial extended into the media, not simply with the extensive coverage given by The Times but also by its representation in graphic Talmapimod web satire. What is notable about these images is the way in which they replicate the same opposition between the personal and the political as had been evident at the trial itself. Figure 1, for example, is a coloured etching by the relatively unknown caricaturist `Dickey Fubs’, its title turning upon a double pun PD168393 chemical information involving Cooper’s backside and the associated tools of the cooper’s trade. One characteristic of the image is the way in which it engages with literary form. Its use of hyperbolic punctuation parallels Wakley’s own typographic style, while Cooper’s cry of `Oh! dear ?Oh! dear . . . ‘ parodies his speech as reported by The Lancet. The other is its starkly personalized representation of the case. Both protagonists are portrayed as identifiable individuals. Cooper is dressed in a surgical apron, through the belt of which are tucked the forceps he attempted to introduce into Pollard’s bladder. Meanwhile, Wakley is shown committing a literal act of bodily violence, appearing through a door to jab Cooper in the buttocks with a lancet. In reference to the damage done to his reputation, Cooper exclaims that `That cursed Lancet has cut so deep, I fear the wound will never be closed’. Wakley likewise alludes to his journal’s incisiveness and Cooper’s incompetence by claiming that, unlike Cooper’s blunt instrument, his lancet is `sharp at the Point’ and will perform a `Scientific Operation with Expedition’. While the Cooper’s Adz depicts the case as a clash between two individuals, Figure 2, a coloured etching by the satirist William Heath (`Paul Pry’), is a rather more complex work.98 Once again, Cooper is clearly identifiable, pictured with surgical apron and rolled-up sleeves and given the irreverent nickname `Barney’. However, instead of a literal representation of Wakley, The Lancet is pictured in figurative form, a writing quill at the tip of its blade. Compared with Figure 1, the Cooper represented here is more sinister. He is shown using his `Uncle’s’ knife to cut The Lancet’s purse, out of which cascades ?00 worth of damages, a remedy, the annotation suggests, `for curing wounded reputations’. Cooper recites a quote from Shakespeare’s Henry the Sixth, `GiveHone for Publishing Three Parodies (London, 1818), 5 ?; The Report of the Proceedings of the Court of King’s Bench . . . Being the Mock Trials of Richard Carlile for Alleged Blasphemous Libels (London, 1822), 123, 203; Epstein, `Radical Expression’, 47. The Lancet, 11:227 (20 December 1828), 373. Heneage, `Heath, William [Paul Pry] (1794/5 ?840)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford, 2004).98S.Social HistoryVOL.39 :NO.Figure 2. William Heath (`Paul Pry’), Barney the Cooper or the Head of the Guy’s performing his Last Operation (c.1828). Reproduced with the permission of Wellcome Images.me thy gold ?if thou hast any Gold, For I have bought it with an hundred blows’, another reference to the sum awarded as well as to his alleged lack of surgical skill.99 As with Figure 1, then, Cooper and The Lancet take centre stage, but to the left of the image is an indicati.His endeavour to extend the political meanings of Cooper’s alleged incompetence. Not only was the trial extremely well attended, but when he finally emerged from the court he was greeted by a large crowd and `cheered by the populace in Palace Yard’.97 Moreover, popular interest in the trial extended into the media, not simply with the extensive coverage given by The Times but also by its representation in graphic satire. What is notable about these images is the way in which they replicate the same opposition between the personal and the political as had been evident at the trial itself. Figure 1, for example, is a coloured etching by the relatively unknown caricaturist `Dickey Fubs’, its title turning upon a double pun involving Cooper’s backside and the associated tools of the cooper’s trade. One characteristic of the image is the way in which it engages with literary form. Its use of hyperbolic punctuation parallels Wakley’s own typographic style, while Cooper’s cry of `Oh! dear ?Oh! dear . . . ‘ parodies his speech as reported by The Lancet. The other is its starkly personalized representation of the case. Both protagonists are portrayed as identifiable individuals. Cooper is dressed in a surgical apron, through the belt of which are tucked the forceps he attempted to introduce into Pollard’s bladder. Meanwhile, Wakley is shown committing a literal act of bodily violence, appearing through a door to jab Cooper in the buttocks with a lancet. In reference to the damage done to his reputation, Cooper exclaims that `That cursed Lancet has cut so deep, I fear the wound will never be closed’. Wakley likewise alludes to his journal’s incisiveness and Cooper’s incompetence by claiming that, unlike Cooper’s blunt instrument, his lancet is `sharp at the Point’ and will perform a `Scientific Operation with Expedition’. While the Cooper’s Adz depicts the case as a clash between two individuals, Figure 2, a coloured etching by the satirist William Heath (`Paul Pry’), is a rather more complex work.98 Once again, Cooper is clearly identifiable, pictured with surgical apron and rolled-up sleeves and given the irreverent nickname `Barney’. However, instead of a literal representation of Wakley, The Lancet is pictured in figurative form, a writing quill at the tip of its blade. Compared with Figure 1, the Cooper represented here is more sinister. He is shown using his `Uncle’s’ knife to cut The Lancet’s purse, out of which cascades ?00 worth of damages, a remedy, the annotation suggests, `for curing wounded reputations’. Cooper recites a quote from Shakespeare’s Henry the Sixth, `GiveHone for Publishing Three Parodies (London, 1818), 5 ?; The Report of the Proceedings of the Court of King’s Bench . . . Being the Mock Trials of Richard Carlile for Alleged Blasphemous Libels (London, 1822), 123, 203; Epstein, `Radical Expression’, 47. The Lancet, 11:227 (20 December 1828), 373. Heneage, `Heath, William [Paul Pry] (1794/5 ?840)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford, 2004).98S.Social HistoryVOL.39 :NO.Figure 2. William Heath (`Paul Pry’), Barney the Cooper or the Head of the Guy’s performing his Last Operation (c.1828). Reproduced with the permission of Wellcome Images.me thy gold ?if thou hast any Gold, For I have bought it with an hundred blows’, another reference to the sum awarded as well as to his alleged lack of surgical skill.99 As with Figure 1, then, Cooper and The Lancet take centre stage, but to the left of the image is an indicati.