Or health (2). Social networks depleted due to drugs, incarceration, premature death

Or health (2). Social networks depleted due to drugs, incarceration, premature death, and mutual estrangement reduce opportunities for reuniting, and finding new social relationships is more difficult when trust in others is in understandably short supply (3). For a small minority of homeless adults who cannot or do not wish to live independently, there is no likelihood that purchase Setmelanotide supervised congregate care will disappear anytime soon. Indeed, philanthropic donations and government funding have overwhelmingly favored visible edifices over the smaller scale and “invisibility” of scatter-site living (an ironic commentary on the greater presumed potential for social integration associated with such edifices). Yet the preponderance of research shows that consumers of psychiatric services prefer having their own domicile over living with strangers who share their troubled histories (4). Shouldn’t this play some role in considering what has gone wrong and what is going right (or at least going in the right direction)? To be sure, supported housing is not a panacea, but its limitations lie more in the larger context than in its raison d’ re. This recalls the oft-told parable of the drunken man looking for his keys under the lamp-post “because that’s where the light is” when he had actually dropped them in the vast dark area around him. Hopper and others who are seeking toPadgettPagebroaden the conversation beyond individual agency are spot-on. But looking for the keys (to social inclusion) under the street light (of supported housing) puts the emphasis in the wrong place and narrows the focus to the least problematic of what is a complex and troubling reality.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript
NIH Public AccessAuthor ManuscriptAugment Altern Commun. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 June 01.Published in final edited form as: Augment Altern Commun. 2014 June ; 30(2): 172?85. doi:10.3109/ML390 molecular weight 07434618.2014.904924.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptThe Potential Influence of “Stimulus Overselectivity” in AAC: Information from Eye-tracking and Behavioral Studies of AttentionWilliam V. Dube and University of Massachusetts Medical School ?Shriver Center Krista M. Wilkinson The Pennsylvania State University and University of Massachusetts Medical School ?Shriver CenterAbstractThis paper examines the phenomenon of “stimulus overselectivity” or “overselective attention” as it may impact AAC training and use in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Stimulus overselectivity is defined as an atypical limitation in the number of stimuli or stimulus features within an image that are attended to and subsequently learned. Within AAC, the term “stimulus” could refer to symbols or line drawings on speech generating devices, drawings or pictures on low-technology systems, and/or the elements within visual scene displays. In this context, overselective attention may result in unusual or uneven error patterns such as confusion between two symbols that share a single feature or difficulties with transitioning between different types of hardware. We review some of the ways that overselective attention has been studied behaviorally. We then examine how eye tracking technology allows a glimpse into some of the behavioral characteristics of overselective attention. We describe an intervention approach, differential observing responses, that may reduce or eliminate overselectivity, and we co.Or health (2). Social networks depleted due to drugs, incarceration, premature death, and mutual estrangement reduce opportunities for reuniting, and finding new social relationships is more difficult when trust in others is in understandably short supply (3). For a small minority of homeless adults who cannot or do not wish to live independently, there is no likelihood that supervised congregate care will disappear anytime soon. Indeed, philanthropic donations and government funding have overwhelmingly favored visible edifices over the smaller scale and “invisibility” of scatter-site living (an ironic commentary on the greater presumed potential for social integration associated with such edifices). Yet the preponderance of research shows that consumers of psychiatric services prefer having their own domicile over living with strangers who share their troubled histories (4). Shouldn’t this play some role in considering what has gone wrong and what is going right (or at least going in the right direction)? To be sure, supported housing is not a panacea, but its limitations lie more in the larger context than in its raison d’ re. This recalls the oft-told parable of the drunken man looking for his keys under the lamp-post “because that’s where the light is” when he had actually dropped them in the vast dark area around him. Hopper and others who are seeking toPadgettPagebroaden the conversation beyond individual agency are spot-on. But looking for the keys (to social inclusion) under the street light (of supported housing) puts the emphasis in the wrong place and narrows the focus to the least problematic of what is a complex and troubling reality.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript
NIH Public AccessAuthor ManuscriptAugment Altern Commun. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 June 01.Published in final edited form as: Augment Altern Commun. 2014 June ; 30(2): 172?85. doi:10.3109/07434618.2014.904924.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptThe Potential Influence of “Stimulus Overselectivity” in AAC: Information from Eye-tracking and Behavioral Studies of AttentionWilliam V. Dube and University of Massachusetts Medical School ?Shriver Center Krista M. Wilkinson The Pennsylvania State University and University of Massachusetts Medical School ?Shriver CenterAbstractThis paper examines the phenomenon of “stimulus overselectivity” or “overselective attention” as it may impact AAC training and use in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Stimulus overselectivity is defined as an atypical limitation in the number of stimuli or stimulus features within an image that are attended to and subsequently learned. Within AAC, the term “stimulus” could refer to symbols or line drawings on speech generating devices, drawings or pictures on low-technology systems, and/or the elements within visual scene displays. In this context, overselective attention may result in unusual or uneven error patterns such as confusion between two symbols that share a single feature or difficulties with transitioning between different types of hardware. We review some of the ways that overselective attention has been studied behaviorally. We then examine how eye tracking technology allows a glimpse into some of the behavioral characteristics of overselective attention. We describe an intervention approach, differential observing responses, that may reduce or eliminate overselectivity, and we co.