Coding and Atlas TI (Hapberg, Germany), a software program designed to

Coding and Atlas TI (Hapberg, Germany), a software program designed to facilitate the analysis of qualitative data. Content analysis was performed for each transcribed interview by three independent coders (the principal investigator and two trained research assistants) as a form of investigator triangulation. An initial list of themes was identified and coded by the principal investigator, a process guided by the theoretical framework described above. A codebook was developed to further define and operationalize each of the themes. New themes and concepts were added to the codebook as they emerged from the transcripts. Two additional members of the research team with expertise in qualitative data analysis coded each transcript independently, coders subsequently met to discuss codes and categories and to further establish the inter-coder agreement. In other words, after all members finished coding the transcript, they met to compare their analysis and discuss discrepancies. Disagreements were discussed until consensus was reached. Using Atlas TI, super-codes and families were generated to facilitate the categorization tree. Categories and sub-categories (i.e. Micro-system level barriers and peer influence, etc.) were derived from initial codes. Grounded analyses and density estimates were also performed. Grounded analysis (G) is the number of NVP-BEZ235MedChemExpress BEZ235 quotations assigned to each code. Density (D) is the number of codes assigned to each category.ResultsTwelve in-depth interviews were conducted with HIV/AIDS patients who voluntarily missed medication doses at any time during the course of their treatment (6 women and 6 men). Participants’ characteristics are summarized in Table 1. Mean age fpsyg.2016.00135 was 40.5 (SD = 11.41) for women and 39.5 (SD = 5.54) for men. Most participants reported a monthly income of 500 or less (n = 8), a high school education level (n = 6), being unemployed (n = 9) and being recipients of government health insurance (n = 11). Three out of six women reported living alone with their children and most men informed living with their parents or other relatives (n = 4). On the other hand, the qualitative analysis of transcripts summarized in Fig 2 revealed seven category themes corresponding to various system level barriers to HAART adherence as well as facilitators. Grounded (G) and density analyses (D) for HAART adherence barriers and facilitators are summarized in Table 2. For the grounded analyses, the top four sub-categories linked to high number of quotations were mental health barriers (G = 32) followed by treatment regimen (G = 28), health system (G = 24) and interpersonal relations (G = 15). The top four sub-PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0125582 JWH-133 biological activity September 30,5 /Barriers and Facilitators for HIV Treatment Adherence in Puerto Ricanscategories linked to high number of codes are treatment regimen (D = 4), health status perception (D = 3), interpersonal relations (D = 3) and health system (D = jir.2010.0097 3).Patients’ perception of level barriers for HAART adherencePatient level HAART adherence barriers were those related to the participant’s personal characteristics, emotions, behaviors and perceptions. When participants were asked about how their thoughts, feeling or personal characteristics might have prevented them in the past from taking the HAART medication, they described a list of factors summarized in these categories: treatment regimen, mental health issues and health status perception. A total of 69 quotations (grounded analysis.Coding and Atlas TI (Hapberg, Germany), a software program designed to facilitate the analysis of qualitative data. Content analysis was performed for each transcribed interview by three independent coders (the principal investigator and two trained research assistants) as a form of investigator triangulation. An initial list of themes was identified and coded by the principal investigator, a process guided by the theoretical framework described above. A codebook was developed to further define and operationalize each of the themes. New themes and concepts were added to the codebook as they emerged from the transcripts. Two additional members of the research team with expertise in qualitative data analysis coded each transcript independently, coders subsequently met to discuss codes and categories and to further establish the inter-coder agreement. In other words, after all members finished coding the transcript, they met to compare their analysis and discuss discrepancies. Disagreements were discussed until consensus was reached. Using Atlas TI, super-codes and families were generated to facilitate the categorization tree. Categories and sub-categories (i.e. Micro-system level barriers and peer influence, etc.) were derived from initial codes. Grounded analyses and density estimates were also performed. Grounded analysis (G) is the number of quotations assigned to each code. Density (D) is the number of codes assigned to each category.ResultsTwelve in-depth interviews were conducted with HIV/AIDS patients who voluntarily missed medication doses at any time during the course of their treatment (6 women and 6 men). Participants’ characteristics are summarized in Table 1. Mean age fpsyg.2016.00135 was 40.5 (SD = 11.41) for women and 39.5 (SD = 5.54) for men. Most participants reported a monthly income of 500 or less (n = 8), a high school education level (n = 6), being unemployed (n = 9) and being recipients of government health insurance (n = 11). Three out of six women reported living alone with their children and most men informed living with their parents or other relatives (n = 4). On the other hand, the qualitative analysis of transcripts summarized in Fig 2 revealed seven category themes corresponding to various system level barriers to HAART adherence as well as facilitators. Grounded (G) and density analyses (D) for HAART adherence barriers and facilitators are summarized in Table 2. For the grounded analyses, the top four sub-categories linked to high number of quotations were mental health barriers (G = 32) followed by treatment regimen (G = 28), health system (G = 24) and interpersonal relations (G = 15). The top four sub-PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0125582 September 30,5 /Barriers and Facilitators for HIV Treatment Adherence in Puerto Ricanscategories linked to high number of codes are treatment regimen (D = 4), health status perception (D = 3), interpersonal relations (D = 3) and health system (D = jir.2010.0097 3).Patients’ perception of level barriers for HAART adherencePatient level HAART adherence barriers were those related to the participant’s personal characteristics, emotions, behaviors and perceptions. When participants were asked about how their thoughts, feeling or personal characteristics might have prevented them in the past from taking the HAART medication, they described a list of factors summarized in these categories: treatment regimen, mental health issues and health status perception. A total of 69 quotations (grounded analysis.