9 NT 90,000?79,999 NT 180,000 Missing Education High school graduates Some college College graduates

9 NT 90,000?79,999 NT 180,000 Missing Education High school graduates Some college College graduates Marital status Others Married Locality Urban Suburban Rural Self-rated health Poor Good Perceived susceptibility Low High Perceived severity Low High Bonding XAV-939 site Social capital Neighborhood supporta Low (< 2.1) Middle (2.1?.4) High (> 3.4) Bridging social capital Association membership No Yes Linking social capital General government trusta (Continued) 59.03 40.97 77.96 80.00 90.19* 93.71 93.98 94.97 27.62 32.78 39.60 75.31* 77.62 82.20 90.46 91.78 92.33 91.70* 94.23 96.38 11.40 88.60 65.33* 80.53 83.92* 92.63 90.95* 94.83 82.23 17.77 77.56* 84.52 90.45* 97.10 93.66* 97.74 38.68 61.32 79.41 78.41 91.70 91.59 94.52 94.30 49.40 38.40 12.21 80.05 76.57 80.75 93.16* 90.90 87.79 95.71* 92.24 95.77 40.40 59.60 78.87 78.75 91.06 92.02 92.77* 95.48 24.81 26.76 48.42 71.36* 79.87 82.01 82.91* 91.65 96.09 93.07 95.29 94.56 24.76 27.39 20.92 21.95 4.99 71.53* 80.96 81.92 79.11 88.51 87.96* 93.31 94.79 89.56 96.55 93.98 94.56 94.79 93.47 97.70 30.83 26.30 27.97 14.90 82.53 76.91 77.46 76.92 94.42* 93.46 92.42 81.15 91.82* 95.86 96.52 93.08 52.49 47.51 81.77* 75.51 90.17* 93.24 93.78 95.05 Total ( ) N = 1745 Vaccination ( ) 78.80 Wear a face mask ( ) 91.63 Wash hands ( ) 94.PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122970 April 15,6 /Social Capital and Behavioral Intentions in an Influenza PandemicTable 1. (Continued) Variables Low (< fpsyg.2014.00822 3) Middle (3?.9) High (> 3.9) Trust in government’s capacity to handle an influenza pandemica Low (< 2.6) Middle (2.6?.3) High (> 3.3)aTotal ( ) 27.79 31.81 40.40 38.17 26.02 35.Vaccination ( ) 72.78* 77.48 83.97 77.33 79.30 80.Wear a face mask ( ) 88.25* 92.25 93.48 90.09 92.51 92.Wash hands ( ) 92.78* 93.33 96.31 95.35 92.73 94.The categories were based on tertiles.*p <. 05. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0122970.tassociation (OR = 1.65) and respondents who had higher general government trust (OR = 1.33) were more likely to have the intention to use a face mask. The results for the intention to wash one's hands more frequently during an influenza pandemic are shown in Table 4. The adjusted model indicates that respondents in suburban areas were less likely than those in urban areas to wash their hands frequently (OR = .54). Regarding the respondents' risk perception, respondents who perceived high susceptibility jir.2013.0113 to the disease were more likely to wash their hands (OR = 2.93). Similar to the results in Table 2, neighborhood support (OR = 1.43) and general government trust (OR = 1.45) were Decumbin web associated with washing one’s hands more frequently during an influenza pandemic.DiscussionBased on the typology of Szreter and Woolcock (2004), this study examined different forms of social capital and their relationships with behavioral intention in response to an influenza pandemic [19]. Regarding linking social capital, this study found that only general government trust was associated with behavioral intention. By contrast, whether or not respondents trusted the government’s capacity to manage the epidemic was not associated with any intention variables. Possible explanations may come from previous research on trust and risk management. Szreter and Woolcock (2004) have identified two dimensions of trust: the first dimension is based on the relationship between the trusting person and the other (relational trust), and the second dimension is based on past behavior of the other (calculative trust) [29,30]. They have suggested that relational tru.9 NT 90,000?79,999 NT 180,000 Missing Education High school graduates Some college College graduates Marital status Others Married Locality Urban Suburban Rural Self-rated health Poor Good Perceived susceptibility Low High Perceived severity Low High Bonding social capital Neighborhood supporta Low (< 2.1) Middle (2.1?.4) High (> 3.4) Bridging social capital Association membership No Yes Linking social capital General government trusta (Continued) 59.03 40.97 77.96 80.00 90.19* 93.71 93.98 94.97 27.62 32.78 39.60 75.31* 77.62 82.20 90.46 91.78 92.33 91.70* 94.23 96.38 11.40 88.60 65.33* 80.53 83.92* 92.63 90.95* 94.83 82.23 17.77 77.56* 84.52 90.45* 97.10 93.66* 97.74 38.68 61.32 79.41 78.41 91.70 91.59 94.52 94.30 49.40 38.40 12.21 80.05 76.57 80.75 93.16* 90.90 87.79 95.71* 92.24 95.77 40.40 59.60 78.87 78.75 91.06 92.02 92.77* 95.48 24.81 26.76 48.42 71.36* 79.87 82.01 82.91* 91.65 96.09 93.07 95.29 94.56 24.76 27.39 20.92 21.95 4.99 71.53* 80.96 81.92 79.11 88.51 87.96* 93.31 94.79 89.56 96.55 93.98 94.56 94.79 93.47 97.70 30.83 26.30 27.97 14.90 82.53 76.91 77.46 76.92 94.42* 93.46 92.42 81.15 91.82* 95.86 96.52 93.08 52.49 47.51 81.77* 75.51 90.17* 93.24 93.78 95.05 Total ( ) N = 1745 Vaccination ( ) 78.80 Wear a face mask ( ) 91.63 Wash hands ( ) 94.PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122970 April 15,6 /Social Capital and Behavioral Intentions in an Influenza PandemicTable 1. (Continued) Variables Low (< fpsyg.2014.00822 3) Middle (3?.9) High (> 3.9) Trust in government’s capacity to handle an influenza pandemica Low (< 2.6) Middle (2.6?.3) High (> 3.3)aTotal ( ) 27.79 31.81 40.40 38.17 26.02 35.Vaccination ( ) 72.78* 77.48 83.97 77.33 79.30 80.Wear a face mask ( ) 88.25* 92.25 93.48 90.09 92.51 92.Wash hands ( ) 92.78* 93.33 96.31 95.35 92.73 94.The categories were based on tertiles.*p <. 05. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0122970.tassociation (OR = 1.65) and respondents who had higher general government trust (OR = 1.33) were more likely to have the intention to use a face mask. The results for the intention to wash one's hands more frequently during an influenza pandemic are shown in Table 4. The adjusted model indicates that respondents in suburban areas were less likely than those in urban areas to wash their hands frequently (OR = .54). Regarding the respondents' risk perception, respondents who perceived high susceptibility jir.2013.0113 to the disease were more likely to wash their hands (OR = 2.93). Similar to the results in Table 2, neighborhood support (OR = 1.43) and general government trust (OR = 1.45) were associated with washing one’s hands more frequently during an influenza pandemic.DiscussionBased on the typology of Szreter and Woolcock (2004), this study examined different forms of social capital and their relationships with behavioral intention in response to an influenza pandemic [19]. Regarding linking social capital, this study found that only general government trust was associated with behavioral intention. By contrast, whether or not respondents trusted the government’s capacity to manage the epidemic was not associated with any intention variables. Possible explanations may come from previous research on trust and risk management. Szreter and Woolcock (2004) have identified two dimensions of trust: the first dimension is based on the relationship between the trusting person and the other (relational trust), and the second dimension is based on past behavior of the other (calculative trust) [29,30]. They have suggested that relational tru.